HOW  TO  INSTALL  THE  MOZILLA  FIREFOX  WEBSITE  BROWSER


Firefox is a website (internet) browser application that is mainly for website developers and people who like ADD-ONs (Apps and so on). Meaning, in general you use Safari for its safety and security features (i.e. for online banking purposes), Google Chrome for its speed and Firefox for its flexibility features (i.e. its ADD-ONs).

The reason for making this section is because more and more people are reading about how Firefox is a more flexible and user friendly web browser in the way it operates and therefore want to try it out. Its ability to download and manage ADD-ONs (Extension programs/tools) is one example and more precisely its ability to pick out ADD-ONs that cater for the user's needs. There are many extensions that cater for the website designer and book authors for example - Extensions that allow them to check their coding/writing, do word counts and so on. There are extensions for different Audio/Video formats and Languages. You can also switch off a website page's element (i.e. block flash movies) and view world clocks. And I've only scratched the surface.


In the example below I have assumed you have already downloaded the Firefox Setup file (Installation Wizard) by clicking on its website's FREE DOWNLOAD button (not shown here), either by visiting its website directly http://www.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/new/, via a search (i.e. search Google for firefox download) or by clicking on the above link. In this example I have downloaded the Firefox Setup file into my DOWNLOADS folder. If you need to see an example of saving (downloading and saving) a file from a website see the 'How To Manually Download / Install Hardware Drivers' section, for example, in the hardware category.



Fig 1.0  Double click on the firefox 20.0.dmg set up file to continue

To install Firefox begin by double clicking on the firefox 20.0.dmg (disk image) file. It contains both the Firefox website browser application and the files needed to install it, including the Installation Wizard. Double clicking on the .dmg file makes OS X Mountain Lion decompress (extract/unzip) the content of the .dmg file (Fig 1.1) whereby a logical hard drive, called Firefox in this case, is then created for that decompressed content and placed on the desktop screen (Fig 1.2). Once that is done the logical hard drive automatically opens to reveal the decompressed content (Fig 1.3).

A Disk Image (.dmg) file is a cross between a .zip (compressed folder) file and a flash drive - When double clicked on OS X Mountain Lion automatically decompresses (unzips) the content of the Disk Image (.dmg) installation file, just as it would a .zip file, but then creates a logical hard drive for it instead of a standard folder. The logical hard drive acts just like a flash drive in that it can be unmounted (removed) from the desktop and OS X Mountain Lion operating system. A bit like Windows 7's 'Safe To Remove Hardware' feature.



Fig 1.1  The firefox 20.0.dmg installation file is being decompressed by OS X Mountain Lion




Fig 1.2  A logical hard drive has been created for the content of the decompressed Disk Image (.dmg)




Fig 1.3  The content of the decompressed Disk Image (.dmg) can be seen via the opened logical hard drive

In the above example the firefox 20.0.dmg disk image has been decompressed and its logical hard drive (Fig 1.2 above) has been automatically opened (Fig 1.3 above). In normal circumstances you would see the decompressed content (folders/files) within the logical hard drive, but in this case the decompressed content (folders/files) is represented by a window that consists of an artificial Firefox.app application icon, Right-Arrow and artificial APPLICATIONS Folder - This is the first step (window) of the firefox Installation Wizard. It is the equivalent of a Windows 7 AutoPlay window (message requester). So instead of seeing real folders and files relating to firefox and its installation, all you see is the above "Drag & Drop" Installation Wizard window.

The Right-Arrow in between the artificial Application File icon (Firefox.app icon) and the artificial APPLICATIONS Folder means you should drag (move) the artificial Application File icon (Firefox.app icon) rightwards, towards the artificial APPLICATIONS Folder, and drop it into the artificial APPLICATIONS Folder. So the first step to installing Firefox is to drag the artificial Firefox.app icon rightwards, towards the artificial APPLICATIONS Folder - Click on the artificial Firefox.app icon and hold down the left mouse button (the click) while you then drag that artificial Firefox.app icon rightwards, towards the artificial APPLICATIONS Folder - As soon as the artificial Firefox.app icon (mouse pointer) is over the artificial APPLICATIONS Folder, denoted by the + (add) mouse pointer, release the left mouse button (click) so that the artificial Firefox.app icon is dropped into the artificial APPLICATIONS Folder (Fig 1.5).



Fig 1.4  Drag the artificial Firefox.app icon rightwards, towards the artificial APPLICATIONS Folder.




Fig 1.5  Drop the artificial Firefox.app icon into the artificial APPLICATIONS Folder

After releasing the left mouse button, with the artificial Firefox.app icon now dropped into the artificial APPLICATIONS Folder, the real Firefox.app application icon will placed inside the real OS X (Mountain Lion) APPLICATIONS folder together with any related firefox, installation, folders and files to denote that firefox has technically been installed at this point. I say technically because it will still need slight initialization (set up) by you.



Fig 1.6  The real firefox installation folders/files are being copied into the real OS X (Mountain Lion) APPLICATIONS folder




Fig 1.7  The real Firefox.app application icon has been placed inside the real APPLICATIONS folder

With firefox almost installed; Double click on the real Firefox.app application icon, within the real APPLICATIONS folder, in order to bring up the following message requester. It basically asks you if you trust this, downloaded from the internet, application called Firefox and more importantly if you want to open it (run it/execute it/launch it). If you do, just click on its OPEN button to continue.



Fig 1.8  Click on the message requester's OPEN button if you trust the Firefox application

One last step of the installation wizard is the Import feature. After clicking on the OPEN button (above) you are then asked if you want to import Bookmarks, Preferences and so on from the Safari website browser application, or from another commonly installed website browser application such as Google Chrome. If you do want to import your Safari Bookmarks and so on, click on the SAFARI radio (circle/dot) button and then on the CONTINUE button to proceed. Otherwise, click on the DON'T IMPORT ANYTHING button before clicking on the CONTINUE button.



Fig 1.9  Select the SAFARI option before clicking on the CONTINUE button to proceed

If you chose to import Bookmarks and so on from the SAFARI website browser application the next step of the installation wizard is to decide which Home Page to use for firefox. The firefox home page or the, imported, safari home page. In this example I have kept everything Safari based by clicking on the IMPORT YOUR HOME PAGE FROM SAFARI option. When you have selected your decision click on the CONTINUE button to proceed.



Fig 1.10  Decide if you want to use the generic Firefox home page or the home page imported from the Safari website browser

When the import steps have been completed the installation of firefox is complete. All you need to do now is click on the FINISH button. If firefox is not the default (normally used) website browser application, which it shouldn't be as it has just been installed and therefore never used, you will be asked if you want to make it the default website browser application - Click on the YES button of the message requester that appears (Fig 1.12 below) to make firefox the default (always used) website browser application.



Fig 1.11  The installation of firefox is complete - Click on the FINISH button to begin using firefox.




Fig 1.12  Click on the YES button to make firefox the default (always used) website browser application

You will know when firefox has been set up as the default (always used) website browser application because any website files (i.e. HTML files) will have their icons changed from the Safari application icon to the Firefox application icon so that when you open one of those files firefox will be launched (opened) instead of safari.



Fig 1.13  The safari website browser application is currently the default (always used) website (internet) browser




Fig 1.14  The firefox website browser application is currently the default (always used) website (internet) browser




Fig 1.15  The firefox website browser application is displaying the Click Wise Computer Services website

Now that firefox has been set up and is usable you can eject (dismount) the logical hard drive that was created (mounted) from its disk image file (firefox 20.0.dmg) - Right click over the firefox logical hard drive desktop icon, to bring up its context (options) menu, and then select the EJECT "Firefox" menu-item. Alternatively, shutting down or restarting the computer will also eject (dismount) the mounted firefox logical hard drive.



Fig 1.16  Right click over the desktop icon of the mounted logical hard drive and then select the EJECT menu-item

If you have viewed the previous Microsoft Office and Bitdefender installation sections you will notice that the main difference with installing a piece of software versus installing an application is that software installations use .pkg files with an uninstaller included whereas an application uses a .dmg file. In other words, a piece of software has a larger installation wizard and more options whereas an application is more or less ready-made, "out of the box", with a simple "Drag & Drop" window (as exampled above).

PKG files are basically .zip (compressed folder) files that contain the actual software files (i.e. BitDefender Anti-Virus 2012 files) alongside the Installer (Set-Up / Installation Wizard) file and Uninstaller (Uninstallation Wizard) file. Double clicking on an Installer file, such as the BitDefenderInstaller.pkg file, automatically executes (launches/runs) the software's Installation Wizard.