THE  EDIT  BOX  EXPLAINED



An edit box is a box that allows you to edit the text already inside it or type in some new text. For example. When you go to rename a folder its current name is put inside an edit box so you can change it (edit it). Below I have just created a new folder so I can show you how its edit box works as the folder's current name is being renamed. The folder's current name is: untitled folder.



Fig 1.1  A newly created folder called: untitled folder

To rename a folder you first need to click on its folder name - untitled folder. That first click on the folder's name tells OS X (Mountain Lion) to make the folder name editable by placing it inside an edit box. From here you can now type some new characters (letters/numbers) directly into the edit box, to overwrite all the existing characters and therefore leave the edit box empty/blank, or you can click anywhere inside the edit box to begin editing (i.e. deleting existing characters and/or inserting new characters). Either way, the background of the edit box will turn white and a flashing cursor will then be positioned where ever you began typing or clicked inside the edit box with the second click.

    

In the example below I have clicked in between letters f and o (Fig 1.2). From here I can type in some new letters and/or delete old ones in order to rename the folder (Figures 1.3 and 1.4). Here I am renaming (editing) untitled folder to untitled films. This didn't have to be the case though. I could of renamed the folder John for example. Regardless of that, as you will notice; An edit box in this case is just a mechanism that allows you to delete existing characters and insert new characters once the edit box has been activated (once the folder name has been clicked on).



Fig 1.2  Click inside the Edit Box, between f and o.


Fig 1.3  Type the letters: ilms


Fig 1.4  Delete the letters: older


Fig 1.5  Press ENTER

When you rename a folder you usually press the ENTER keyboard key, or click anywhere outside of the edit box, in order to deactivate the edit box and set the folder's new name; which I have done in Fig 1.5 above.

THE  ADDRESS  BAR


The address bar, which also has an edit box on it, allows you to type in a new website address or edit an existing website address. It can also be used to insert/edit folder or file Path Names. To edit a path name - Click on the right-hand-side of the existing path name (Fig 2.1) to highlight and select its text (Fig 2.2) and then change the path name by editing its text. Either press the DEL (delete) keyboard key to delete all of the text or click on the part of the path name you want to edit from (Fig 2.3) and then start typing. The flashing cursor indicates where your edit point is. In this example, at the end of the path name (Fig 2.3).



Fig 2.1  Click inside the Address Bar edit box, on the right-hand-side of the path name to.....




Fig 2.2  .....highlight and select the path name (text) - Press the DELete keyboard key to clear it or.....




Fig 2.3  .....edit the path name (text) by clicking on the first character or area you want editing.

With website addresses you simply click inside the Address Bar edit box of your web browser (i.e. Safari), type in a website address and then press the ENTER keyboard key to go to (visit/display) that website address. Fig 3.1 below is showing the website address of the website I am currently viewing (www.bbc.co.uk), which is then highlighted and selected in Fig 3.2 by clicking once inside the Address Bar edit box of the Safari web browser application. Pressing the DEL (delete) keyboard key at this point would clear that website address from the Address Bar edit box. Alternatively, clicking inside the Address Bar edit box at this point (Fig 3.3) would allow you to edit that website address (Fig 3.4).



Fig 3.1  The website address currently inside the Address Bar edit box is www.bbc.co.uk




Fig 3.2  Click inside the Address Bar edit box to highlight and select the website address - Press the DELete keyboard key to clear it or.....




Fig 3.3  .....edit the website address (text) by clicking on the first character or area you want editing.




Fig 3.4  Type a new website address into the Address Bar edit box of the Safari web browser application

If you have typed a website's address into the Address Bar edit box before and therefore visited that website, or the website's address is inside your web browser's history for whatever reason(s), the Address Bar edit box might automatically display that website's address as a suggestion or option (Fig 4.2); depending on its popularity and so on. In which case, you would normally click on that displayed (suggested) website address (Fig 4.3) whereby the Address Bar edit box is then filled in for you with that displayed (suggested) website address and Safari then visits that displayed (suggested) website.

I say "normally" and "might" above because in some cases the Address Bar edit box waits for certain criteria to be met, based on what you are typing into it, before it decides whether or not to take you to a Search Results page or an actual website. This is because the Address Bar edit box doubles up as both a Search Engine and a Website Browser (Displayer).



Fig 4.1  One important thing to remember about the Address Bar edit box - It can be a Search Engine or a Website Browser

As an example of the just said. Below I have deleted the words www.bbc.co.uk from the Address Bar edit box, so the Address Bar edit box is empty (as in Fig 4.1 above), and then begun to type www.app (Fig 4.2 below). This has then made the Address Bar edit box bring up some suggested website addresses, from Safari's history for example, associated with Apple; such as www.apple.com/support, which I have then clicked on. This in turn has then told Safari to display Search Engine results as opposed to visiting the suggested website. Why? Because the criteria was not met.


The forward slash (/) was not on the end of the suggested website (i.e. www.apple.com/support/) and I did not manually type in the suggested website's name. Hence why the Address Bar edit box thought I wanted the Search Engine results page for www.apple.com/support. Also denoted by the Magnifying Glass inside the actual Address Bar edit box. In other words, it thought www.apple.com/support was a wording (phrase) to be searched for as opposed to a valid website address. A valid website address (i.e. one with .com and/or a forward slash on it) would of been denoted by a World Globe inside the Address Bar edit box and not a magnifying glass (Fig 4.5). This is not Safari getting confused!!....It's just the way Safari works out its criteria for its Address Bar edit box!!



Fig 4.2  Typing www.app into the Address Bar edit box brings up suggestions and options for www.apple.com for example




Fig 4.3  Clicking on the suggested website - www.apple.com/support - will take me to a Search Results page for that suggested website




Fig 4.4  As soon as you manually start typing out .co (i.e. .co.uk or .com) the Address Bar edit box knows you want to use a website




Fig 4.5  Adding /support onto www.apple.com means the Address Bar edit box still knows you want to use a website

As well as typing something into an edit box, an edit box might also be multiple purpose as you have just seen with the Address Bar edit box. It can distinguish between a phrase and a website address (most of the time!) but can also be used to change search engines. If you click on the Magnifying Glass icon to the left-side of the Address Bar edit box you can then select the Search Engine you want to use.



Fig 4.6  Click on the Magnifying Glass icon to change the Search Engine used by the Address Bar edit box




Fig 4.7  The Search Engine used by the Address Bar edit box has changed to Yahoo!

OTHER  EDIT  BOXES


Edit boxes can be found in many different types of window. Here are four more examples of where an edit box can be found. In this first example the USERNAME and PASSWORD boxes on the gmail e-mail Sign In web page are both edit boxes. Furthermore, just like the edit boxes above, you can COPY & PASTE information between them. For example. You could COPY the e-mail address from the USERNAME edit box (Fig 5.1) and PASTE it into a Microsoft Word document (Fig 5.2).



Fig 5.1  The USERNAME and PASSWORD boxes on the gmail e-mail Sign In web page are both edit boxes

The main editing area (main window) of a Microsoft Word document is actually an edit box. An edit box on a more advanced scale simply because you can PASTE text, photos and other objects into it as well as COPY text, photos and other objects from it. Below I gave pasted the text (e-mail address) I copied from the gmail e-mail USERNAME edit box into the Microsoft Word document (main window / edit box).



Fig 5.2  The main editing area (main window) of a Microsoft Word document is actually an edit box

This next example is of the Google Search box which is also an edit box and behaves similar to the Address Bar edit box search function in that it brings up suggestions based on what you are typing into the edit box. It allows you to type a word or phrase to search for, bringing up suggestions along the way, before you either click on a suggestion or click on the Magnify Glass button next to it.



Fig 5.3  The Google Search box is an edit box similar to the Address Bar edit box

In this final example is the Folder window. It is also an edit box because it allows you to manipulate/modify/edit the contents within it (copy from, paste into, drag from, drag into, rename folders and files, move folders and files, etc). It is an advanced edit box just like the Microsoft Word document window.



Fig 5.4  In this example I am moving (dragging) two photo files from the current folder into another folder

As you can see; Edit boxes come in many shapes and sizes with different functions behind them, but their main function is to allow you to edit (modify) their contents. Other examples of an edit box include the Window Panes you see in e-mail applications and the File Name box you see in a SAVE file requester.

EDITING  KEYS


You can use the following keyboard keys to help you edit your text.

Left Cursor Key

Move the flashing cursor leftwards.

Right Cursor Key

Move the flashing cursor rightwards.

Up Cursor Key

Move the flashing cursor upwards.

Down Cursor Key

Move the flashing cursor downwards.

Tab Key

Move down the drop-down list of already typed website addresses. Press SHIFT and then TAB to move up the list.

HOME Key

 

Move the flashing cursor to the beginning of the text.

END Key

 

Move the flashing cursor to the end of the text.

DEL Key

 

Delete the current character (to the right of the flashing cursor).